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23 August

Thanks to the AAF of GFL and the Palm Beaches for this great interview!

(Q) How did you break into the industry?
(A)Both Frank Linero and Scott Pringle -principals of LP Media, have been in the production industry for almost 3 decades.  We met about twelve years ago and shortly thereafter realized that there was a great need to establish a full service video and film production and post house in Broward County.  After doing our research and due diligence, Scott and I seized this opportunity and founded LP Media, Inc.  In the last decade, we have produced hundreds of commercials, corporate videos, music specials, documentaries and more.  We take pride in every project we work on and above all, we believe in giving our clients the best customer service possible.(Q) What does the Commercial Film Production landscape look like in South Florida?
(A)The South Florida production landscape is definitely very competitive and diverse.  From producers to directors of photography to graphic artists, there are some incredibly talented professionals in our area.  We collaborate with many industry partners in this area because we believe that in order to create the best possible product for your clients, you must leverage those that rae great at what they do… we can’t crate great film and video by ourselves.(Q) What advice would you give to aspiring filmmakers looking to break into the industry today?
(A)I would tell any one who is interested in breaking into this industry to learn as much as possible about technology and workflow… workflow workflow workflow is the key.  With the rapid evolution of acquisition formats, post production technologies and channels of distribution, I believe that half the battle is in having a deep understanding of how to combine and leverage the right technologies for each project.  Of course creativity plays a big roll in how your work is perceived by both clients and industry pros, but knowing how to leverage technology and workflow will make you a much more efficient producer.

(Q) What tools or skills are invaluable to the modern day filmmaker?
(A) As I mentioned before, understanding technology and workflow is crucial.  I also think that young filmmakers should do their best to “wear as many hats” as possible.  In other words, work in all of the different areas of production such as gripping, producing, photography, editing, etc.  Exposing yourself to different disciplines within the production world will definitely make you a more well-rounded professional.  And lastly, be patient with regards to how fast you grow within the industry.  You can’t expect to make your first big film at the beginning of your career… you have to work your way up the ladder.  There is a good reason for this; once you learn how all of the facets of production work, you will be more empowered to produce the best quality product possible.

(Q) What are your external influences, and where do you find your inspiration?
(A) I draw my inspiration from watching everything I can.  No matter what genere of media, I truly ingest everything from commercials, to news, to magazine format shows, documentareis  and many more.  Having had the opportunity to work in so many different areas of media over my career, I guess I consider myself a true media junkie… not always for the content but definitely to observe all of the different styles and trends.  Although many ideas are born through a creative process between you and your team, looking at everybody else’s work gives you education, perspective and sometimes even humility… and staying humble is key.

(Q) Is a filmmaking course essential to a successful career?
(A) I am not a big believer in going to “Film School” per se, however that is a matter of preference and choice.  I believe that ours is a craft that is best learned by getting out there and working hard.  I believe that filmmaking needs and “apprenticeship” approach.  Having sad that, taking workshop-type courses is also a great way to learn about new techniques and technology.  Look for workshops that you may be interested in and sign up.

(Q) What are the three mistakes filmmakers are making?
(A) I think a typical mistake that young filmmakers make is not taking the time to learn and understand the capabilities of available technology and workflow.  Also, I think aspiring industry professionals should not be afraid to ask experienced producers to let them tag along on their projects.  Being an observer on other people’s projects from production to post as another great way to get a free education.  But by far the biggest mistake I think many young people in our field make is not having the patience to put in their “dues” before taking on large projects.  Being passionate and aggressively pursuing opportunities is a good thing, however letting yourself believe that your are further along as a professional than your really are will set you up for failure.

At the end of the day my philosophy about what makes us “good” at what we do is simple.  Creativity is important, but it is also very subjective.  What I create you may not like and others may.  But what truly makes us “good” in our industry is to be handed a project and having the experience to anticipate the three main things that can go wrong with that project, and staying three steps ahead of those problems… that’s what makes us truly “good” at what we do.

 

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